My Marketing Hooks

In light of the last post, it is important to understand what we buy into and how marketing caters to our tastes. It would be foolish to say that I am not affected by marketing at all. In the name of confession here are my hooks:

–I shop at Kowalski’s because the environment neat and clean. I like the attention to detail and the quality of their products. Their pre-made food sections are excellent. I only have to feed myself so the budget isn’t a problem. But the biggest plus is that the store is SMALL. I don’t like crowded supermarkets at all.

–I frequent Buffalo Wild Wings often. Wings, sports, and beer come cheap and quickly complete with a number of wide screens that broadcast sporting events. It doesn’t try to be fancy and it offends yuppie sensibilities and that’s the way I like it.

–I believe in the Barnes & Noble model. Any store that has a huge selection of cheap books and lots of couches, chairs and the option to sip a hot cup of coffee knows how to sell to me. Let me use your product in a comfortable environment and I will come back again and again.

–I bet Google could get me to sell my soul to them through a nifty, easy-to-use interface. MSN, Yahoo, and whoever else deserve to be put out of business by these guys.

Here’s the stuff that doesn’t work:

–Apple has only ever managed to get me to buy and iPod and use iTunes. That is probably a success, but for as much I enjoy their products and love their advertisements I have never bought a Mac and don’t plan to. When it gets down to it I want things that are cheap, replaceable, and easy to use. PCs always win in all three categories.

–Budweiser Beer products have by far the funniest and catchiest commercials. But their beer is just plain disgusting and everyone knows it. Bud Select is their best product but it is under marketed. Get a clue.

–MTV always seemed like an avenue of selling out to me. Whenever anything gets plastered on its airwaves I want little to do with it. This has affected my taste in music significantly because my thesis has been anything that gets played on it is automatically bad. The masses are asses I always say, and whatever MTV thinks the masses want can’t be good no matter how much I might like it.(this actually affected my taste for Radiohead’s music, which terribly unfair, I know).

–TGI Fridays has this guy with blond, spiky hair doing commercials for them now which typifies the kind of atmosphere I don’t want to eat in. I confess this is prejudiced and even inconsistent (see the Buffalo Wild Wings comments above), but it has the feeling of a frat house rather than a restaurant. Whatever.

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7 thoughts on “My Marketing Hooks

  1. “I shop at Kowalski’s because the environment neat and clean.”

    I am continually amazed at how Minnesotans have been hoodwinked into believing that cleanliness is a luxury when it comes to grocery stores. I can’t imagine any other region of the country where Cub foods could stay in business. I feel like I’m in Haiti when I shop there.

    “Bud Select is their best product but it is under marketed. Get a clue. ”

    Not undermarketed. Poorly marketed. They spent a heck of a lot of money on a microsite for this product, for example, but the site is gloomy, uninteresting and unrelated to the rest of their campaign.

    “It doesn’t try to be fancy and it offends yuppie sensibilities and that’s the way I like it. ”

    BW3 is the best place to drink alone.

    “I believe in the Barnes & Noble model. ”

    This also blows my mind. How did a major corporation beat out local merchants in creating a warmer, more intimate book purchasing experience? My dad’s book store was put out of business by a B. Daltons.

    “TGI Fridays has this guy with blond, spiky hair doing commercials for them now which typifies the kind of atmosphere I don’t want to eat in. ”

    That dude was in town for his Food network show on diners. We were at the Town Talk the other day while they were filming. You definitely want to eat at the Town Talk.

  2. Elton says:

    It’s the product itself that causes the consumer to come back, not the marketing. The marketing will attract new customers once.

    As for the article on http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/126/a-dirty-shame.html, I see it as a rant against something the author didn’t like on the day he/she wrote the article. Marketing of many ideas/products has played up the “pleasure” or the “pain” angle. Just think about global warming warning messages, social justice Gospel, anti-tax, anti-pork messages – it’s common to appeal to the personal pain to spur action.

  3. “It’s the product itself that causes the consumer to come back, not the marketing. The marketing will attract new customers once.”

    If that were true, there would be no such thing as permission marketing.

  4. When you buy from Target online, they bombard your inbox with various advertisements. Restaurants have fan clubs, which essentially do the same thing (though you usually score free dessert on your birthday) . It is called permission marketing because they ostensibly have permission to engage you in this manner (you can refuse to join a fan club, and you can opt out of Target e-mails).

    But that is only one example. Porsche spends just as much advertising to Porsche owners (they even have a driving school) as they do attracting new buyers. The first people to find out about the Cayenne were owners of Porsche vehicles. Frequent Flyer miles are utilized to attach tangible value to brand loyalty, and also as a way of collecting information for marketing purposes.

  5. Elton says:

    Based on this explanation and others on the web, it seems to me that “permission marketing” is the ultimate channel-marketing with the buyer as the main channel. You can market to the buyer channel all you want but the customer won’t return if your product sucks.

    I won’t own another Mazda for a while because my Rx8 was a POJ. It doesn’t matter how many e-mails or glossies I get from Mazda. I get e-mails from United Airlines, but my preferred airline is American/Alaska/Delta partnership because UA on-time rate (for N of 1 here) is horrible.

    The product is where the rubber meets the road IMO. Obviously, if the tire peels off (see Firestone) while the car is moving, the customer is not coming back, dead or alive.

    TV programming is another good example of bad products get the hook fast. Remember the sitcom that was supposed to replace Friends? They hyped it up big time and pulled it within 4-5 episodes. I can’t even remember the name of the show – that’s how bad it was. The viewers left it quickly and the show died a spectacular death.

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